Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO)

Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO)
 Greater Toronto Area
  317 Dundas Street W , Toronto , Ontario ,
 416-979-6648

Description

The AGO offers an incredible art experience with each visit!

Highlights include Galleria Italia, a gleaming showcase of wood and glass running the length of an entire city block, and the often-photographed spiral staircase, beckoning visitors to explore. The AGO has an active membership program offering great value, and the AGO's Weston Family Learning Centre offers engaging art and creative programs for children, families, youth and adults.

African Collection
The AGO’s collection of African art is not only the largest of its kind in a Canadian art museum, but also one of the most prestigious collections of African art in Canada. It is almost entirely the result of Dr. Murray Frum’s generous gifts to the Gallery since 1997, and serves to further enrich and expand the fabric of the Gallery’s collection of art outside the European tradition.

About the AGO's Canadian Collection
The AGO has an outstanding collection of Canadian art, with a particular emphasis on the art of Toronto and Ontario. The Canadian Art department is responsible for all work from the earliest forms of human expression (that fall within current national boundaries) to 1985, including First Nations and Inuit. The Thomson Collection of Canadian art elevates the AGO’s holdings, particularly in its presentation of historic First Nation's art of the Pacific Northwest alongside works by Cornelius Krieghoff, Tom Thomson, the Group of Seven and Emily Carr, David Milne, Paul Emile Borduas, William Kurelek and Alex Colville. Many important Canadian works are also part of the AGO's Photography and Prints and Drawings collections.

About the AGO's European Collection
The works in this collecting area have traditionally represented a survey of European art from the Italian Renaissance to the mid-1900s. More than 1,000 works of art from the Thomson Collection have bolstered the core strength of the European holdings, adding mostly small-scale sculpture dating from the Middle Ages to the 1700s. While the centrepiece of the Thomson Collection is Peter Paul Rubens's monumental Flemish Baroque painting Massacre of the Innocents (c. 1611–1612), the works that most typified Kenneth Thomson's collecting interests were diminutive, precious and made from natural materials such as ivory and boxwood.

About the AGO's Modern Collection
The twentieth-century collecting area consists of paintings and sculptures by European artists dating from 1900 to 1960, and by American artists from 1945 to 1960. The collection includes important paintings and sculptures by such masters as Pablo Picasso, Constantin Brancusi, Henri Matisse, Marc Chagall, Raoul Dufy, Paul Gauguin, Joan Miró and Amedeo Modigliani. It also comprises an exceptional cluster of Surrealist works and one of the strongest sculpture collections in North America, featuring the internationally renowned Henry Moore Sculpture Centre and works by Dame Barbara Hepworth and Naum Gabo. The American modern collection includes a number of key works by Abstract Expressionist artists and their influences. Foremost among them are major paintings by Sam Francis, Arshile Gorky, Hans Hofmann, Franz Kline, Robert Motherwell, Mark Rothko and an important sculpture by David Smith

About the AGO's Photography Collection
Since the AGO made a commitment in 1978 to collect photography in depth, its collection has grown significantly in numbers and in distinction, through major gifts and select purchases. The collection spans the history of the medium from the 1840s to the present day, and now includes more than 50,000 works. Highlights from the 19th century include calotypes by British photographer Linnaeus Tripe, who photographed in Burma and in British India in the 1850s, heliogravures by 19th-century French photographer Édouard Baldus, and important holdings of the work of Charles Nègre.

About the AGO's Prints and Drawings Collection
The AGO’s Prints and Drawings Collection spans the entire history of works on paper in the West from the 1400s to the present day, and intersects with all the other collecting areas. The Prints and Drawings department encompasses all works on paper and administers the Marvin Gelber Print and Drawing Study Centre, which houses over 20,000 prints and drawings and the related collection of 53,000 photographs. Built largely over the past 35 years, the prints and drawings collection is of international importance and rivals that of the National Gallery of Canada

About the AGO's Thomson Collection
The works in this collecting area have traditionally represented a survey of European art from the Italian Renaissance to the mid-1900s. More than 1,000 works of art from the Thomson Collection have bolstered the core strength of the European holdings, adding mostly small-scale sculpture dating from the Middle Ages to the 1700s. While the centrepiece of the Thomson Collection is Peter Paul Rubens’ monumental Flemish Baroque painting Massacre of the Innocents (c. 1611–1612), the works that most typified Kenneth Thomson’s collecting interests were diminutive, precious and made from natural materials such as ivory and boxwood.

Events, lectures, tours, screenings, programs, membership benefits and so much more. Visit us today.

  • Hours of Operation : Gallery Hours
    Monday CLOSED
    Tuesday 10:30 am – 5 pm
    Wednesday 10:30 am – 9 pm
    Thursday 10:30 am – 5 pm
    Friday 10:30 am – 9 pm
    Saturday 10:30 am – 5:30 pm
    Sunday 10:30 am – 5:30 pm
  • Wheelchair Accessible : No

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